NASA Awards Top Three Design Finalists in 3-D Printed Habitat Challenge

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The first-place award of $25,000 went to Team Space Exploration Architecture and Clouds Architecture Office of New York, New York, for their design, Mars Ice House.

NASA awarded three teams a total of $40,000 in the first stage of the 3-D Printed Habitat Challenge Design Competition at the New York Maker Faire on Sunday, Sept. 27. The design competition challenged participants to develop architectural concepts that take advantage of the unique capabilities 3-D printing offers to imagine what habitats on Mars might look like using this technology and in-situ resources.

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The competition is part of NASA’s Centennial Challenges program and is managed by America Makes, a partnership of organizations focused on accelerating capabilities and adoption of additive manufacturing technology.

Second place and $15,000 was awarded to Team Gamma for their habitat design.
Second place and $15,000 was awarded to Team Gamma for their habitat design.

More than 165 submissions were received, and the 30 highest-scoring entries were judged, displayed at the Maker Faire event. The first-place award of $25,000 went to Team Space Exploration Architecture and Clouds Architecture Office for their design, Mars Ice House. Second place and $15,000 was awarded to Team Gamma. Third place was awarded to Team LavaHive.

The top 30 submissions can be viewed here.

Team LavaHive was awarded third place honors for their Mars habitat design.
Team LavaHive was awarded third place honors for their Mars habitat design.

“The creativity and depth of the designs we’ve seen have impressed us,” said Centennial Challenges Program Manager Monsi Roman. “These teams were not only imaginative and artistic with their entries, but they also really took into account the life-dependent functionality our future space explorers will need in an off-Earth habitat.”

Teams were judged on many factors, including architectural concept, design approach, habitability, innovation, functionality, Mars site selection and 3-D print constructability. The design competition is the first milestone of the 3-D Printed Habitat Challenge, which seeks to foster the development of new technologies necessary to additively manufacture a habitat using local indigenous materials with, or without, recyclable materials, in space and on Earth.

NASA’s Centennial Challenges Program is part of the agency’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. The program is managed at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

Learn more about the challenge at www.nasa.gov/3DPHab and americamakes.us/challenge.

For more challenge and prize opportunities with NASA, visit www.nasa.gov/solve.

Learn more about the winning team and Mars Ice House at www.marsicehouse.com.

Kickoff at World Maker Faire, NYC

The Mars Foundation just kicked off this “Mars Maker.Space” at the World MakerFaire in New York City.  Our exhibit featured a Lulzbot Mini 3D printer. We have another Lulzbot  for demos at the Hi-Seas Mars Habitat on a lava field in Hawaii. The exhibit also featured some items you might 3D print on Mars, pictures, and reports. Continue reading Kickoff at World Maker Faire, NYC

Welcome

MarsMaker1

Join the brand new Mars Maker Space network, use 3D printers and FabLab to build on Mars.

Sponsored by the Mars Foundation, MarsFoundation.org dedicated to Mars Settlement.

  • $1 million prize: clearinghouse to join, or form, your team to compete at 2 NASA funded 3D challenges
  • Design and 3D print a Mars Rover on our Lulzbot 3D Printer at the Hi-Seas Mars Habitat, shown above
  • Laser cut your greenhouse equipment for food, from local Mars materials
  • Exchange info on use of Mars regolith for composite or masonry construction on Mars
  • Wiki of Mars construction technologies
  • Meet like minded people who want to open a new frontier for everyone
  • Suggest your own ideas

MakerSpaces are the major breakthrough enabling the first practical space settlement.

Note, the polymer raw materials can be made from the Martian air and water.  The Mars soil can be sintered for construction material. Don’t bring materials from Earth.

FREE basic membership, but please consider:
Regular membership – $20
You don’t need a 3D printer. Open to individuals or MakerSpaces

[photos by Hi-Seas & Lulzbot / Mars Maker Space & Mars Foundation are are TM by Mars Foundation; 501(c)(3) (mms-flier-v1)]